My Stitchcraft collection skips some issues after October 1945, so the next one is this crazy hat number, August – September 1946.

Stitchcraft Aug 1946

 

Click the picture for the pdf or scroll down for pictures

Really, what was the designer thinking? That hat is simply bonkers.

There are a few more crazy hats, a lovely bedjacket that makes me wish I was better at lacy patterns (33-35 inch bust), two short sleeved jumpers with bows at the neck (also 33-35 inch bust), a man’s plain pullover in honeycomb stitch (40-42) and three charming jumpers – white short sleeves for 32-34 inch bust; shorts sleeved cardigan jumper for 32-34 inch bust; and short or long sleeves with interesting stripe and bobble pattern (referred to as ZigZag jumper) for 33-35 inch bust. On the back cover (pattern on page 4) is a lovely embroidered hat and handbag.

There is a tiny book review for Dress Making and Dress Design by Bernard Del Monte, on page 9, which grumbles that it doesn’t cover cutting on the bias and that “surely a normal female with a 34-inch bust does not usually have hips measuring 40 inches.” This book intrigues me.

Stitchcraft Aug 19461

Stitchcraft Aug 19462

Stitchcraft Aug 19463

Stitchcraft Aug 19464

 

Stitchcraft Aug 19465

Stitchcraft Aug 19466

Stitchcraft Aug 19467

Stitchcraft Aug 19468

Stitchcraft Aug 19469

Stitchcraft Aug 194610

Stitchcraft Aug 194611

Stitchcraft Aug 194612

Stitchcraft Aug 194613

Stitchcraft Aug 194614

Stitchcraft Aug 194615

Stitchcraft Aug 194616

Stitchcraft Aug 194617

Stitchcraft Aug 194618

Stitchcraft Aug 194619

 

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3 responses to “Free Vintage Magazine – Stitchcraft August- September 1946 with lots of knitting patterns”

  1. Deborah Martin Avatar

    As reaction to World War 2 functional clothing, in post-war period, fashion became frivolous and fun again–recall revolutionary “New Look” that emphasized feminine figure. Fantasy hats could be made of materials not in short supply because needed for “war effort” (another example–ballet flats became fashionable because were type of shoe not affected by rationing). Even before war period there were famous 1930’s Surrealist haute couture like Schiparelli’s “Shoe hat” and collaboration with artist Dali for “Lobster dress”. https://www.vogue.com/article/dali-schiaparlli-in-daring-fashion-exhibit-dali-museum See also striking hat designs in Fred Astaire, Judy Garland movie EASTER PARADE, and (according to Wikipedia), the parody of a real-life famous hairdresser in number “Anatole of Paris” in Danny Kaye movie THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY. (remake starred Ben Stiller of ZOOLANDER, another parody of over the top haute couture). BTW, some less than graceful 1940’s styles (platform shoes, perhaps?) were rumored to be created by designers in Occupied France to make female companions of Nazi’s in Paris look like frumpy frauleins…. fashion “sabotage”!

  2. Deborah Martin Avatar

    As reaction to World War 2 functional clothing, in post-war period, fashion became frivolous and fun again–recall revolutionary “New Look” that emphasized feminine figure. Fantasy hats could be made of materials not in short supply because needed for “war effort” (another example–ballet flats became fashionable because were type of shoe not affected by rationing). Even before war period there were famous 1930’s Surrealist haute couture like Schiparelli’s “Shoe hat” and collaboration with artist Dali for “Lobster dress”. https://www.vogue.com/article/dali-schiaparlli-in-daring-fashion-exhibit-dali-museum See also striking hat designs in 1948 Fred Astaire & Judy Garland movie EASTER PARADE, and (according to Wikipedia), the parody of a real-life famous hairdresser in number “Anatole of Paris” in Danny Kaye 1947 movie THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY. (remake starred Ben Stiller of ZOOLANDER, another parody of over the top haute couture). BTW, some less than graceful 1940’s styles (platform shoes, perhaps?) were rumored to be created by designers in Occupied France to make female companions of Nazi’s in Paris look like frumpy frauleins…. fashion “sabotage”!
    https://pensandoenparientes.blogspot.com/

  3. Deborah Avatar

    Just remembered some other fantasy “hats” described in 1951 book SPIDERWEB FOR TWO by one of my favorite authors, Elizabeth Enright in chapter “Between Two Roofs”, one made of wisp of netting & sprig of artificial flowers, another of a ribbon, cloth daisies and a real butterfly. Older brother of fashionista girls is inspired to make “matching” comic creation for horse using toothbrushes , feather duster and paper roses.

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